Publications

BESiDE is taking a cross-disciplinary approach in generating new knowledge within academia, working with our stakeholders to understand built environment needs. Results are being disseminated through publication in journals and conferences in multiple disciplines: The built-environment disciplines (architecture, design, urban design and interior design); Clinical practice; Care home research; Innovative wearable technology; Dialogue Systems in AI.

2017

Journal Paper

  • International Journal of Architectural Research: ArchNet-IJAR          
    The Effects of Built Environment Design on Opportunities for Wellbeing In Care Homes

    The built environment influences the wellbeing of older people in care homes. In order to design for enablement, physical activity, and social connectivity there are lessons to be learnt from current care home buildings. Uncovering this design information is key for the future improvement of environments for older people. To the field of architecture, this paper presents an analysis of ethnographic observations (utilising an adapted form of the AEIOU heuristic) from five urban care homes in the UK.

Other outputs

  • Discovery Research Portal          
    DATASET Recorded Observation in Care Homes from BESiDE Study

    This data-set contains information of recorded ethnographic observations (utilising an adapted form of the AEIOU heuristic) from five urban care homes in the UK. These observations are formatted in both transcribed and coded tables and as scans of original field notes. The data set includes method statements describing the process of data capture. Affinity mapping was employed to open-code the data and develop a code book. Five high-level spatial qualities emerged: Spatial Legibility, Spatial Interconnectedness, Spatial Traversability, Spatial Diversity and Spatial Aesthetics.

2016

Journal Paper

  • Architecture Research Quarterly          
    Knowledge exchange methods in practice: knowing how to design for older adults

    Complex design challenges exist in designing for a dynamic and ageing world. Designing for older adults is a timely and important issue. Understanding user requirements is vital and the appropriate exchange of this knowledge is crucial in the pursuit of supportive, sustainable buildings and the longevity of built-environment design. Capturing reflections from Built Environment Professionals (BEPs) in the UK, this paper investigates the practitioners’ viewpoint on knowledge exchange by specifically focusing on the scenario of designing for the requirements of older people.

Newspaper/ Magazine Article

  • ACM interactions          
    'Just passing through': research in care homes

    There has been a huge growth in the amount of research being done in residential care homes for older people with formal care needs. A care home has an unusual dual environment being both a workplace and a communal home for a number of adults. Navigating the norms and mores of the workplace while maintaining the etiquette of visiting in someone’s home creates some serious challenges for researchers. This paper highlights the issues with a view to offering some initial suggestions to encourage more HCI researchers to bring their skills to this challenging field of work.

Conference Proceeding

  • Third Workshop on Argument Mining (ArgMining2016)          
    The CASS Technique for Evaluating the Performance of Argument Mining

    Argument mining integrates many distinct computational linguistics tasks, and as a result, reporting agreement between annotators or between automated output and gold standard is particularly challenging. More worrying for the field, agreement and performance are also reported in a wide variety of different ways, making comparison between approaches difficult. To solve this problem, we propose the CASS technique for combining metrics covering different parts of the argument mining task.

  • Proceedings of DRS2016: Design + Research + Society - Future-Focused Thinking          
    Crafted with Care: Reflections from co-designing wearable technologies with care home residents

    With increasing longevity and changes in population demographics; designers, engineers, and architects are faced with the challenge of providing older adults with enabling technologies and home environments that facilitate physical activity and wellbeing. To promote acceptance and adoption, making these technologies more desirable and less stigmatizing is crucial. In this paper, we outline a craft-based co-design methodology that we developed working with groups of care home residents designing wearables for research.

  • Computational Models of Argument : Proceedings of COMMA 2016          
    Argument Analytics

    Rapid growth in the area of argument mining has resulted in an ever increasing volume of analysed argument data. Being able to store information about arguments people make in favour or against different opinions, decisions and actions is a highly valuable resource, yet extremely challenging for sense-making.

  • LREC 2016, Tenth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation          
    A Corpus of Argument Networks: Using Graph Properties to Analyse Divisive Issues

    Governments are increasingly utilising online platforms in order to engage with, and ascertain the opinions of, their citizens. Whilst policy makers could potentially benefit from such enormous feedback from society, they first face the challenge of making sense out of the large volumes of data produced. This creates a demand for tools and technologies which will enable governments to quickly and thoroughly digest the points being made and to respond accordingly.

  • Computational Models of Argument : Proceedings of COMMA 2016          
    Argument Mining using Argumentation Scheme Structures

    Argumentation schemes are patterns of human reasoning which have been detailed extensively in philosophy and psychology. In this paper we demonstrate that the structure of such schemes can provide rich information to the task of automatically identify complex argumentative structures in natural language text. By training a range of classifiers to identify the individual proposition types which occur in these schemes, it is possible not only to determine where a scheme is being used, but also the roles played by its component parts.

Software

  • GitHUB          
    Traces

    Traces is a software utility for recording data from Android smartphones and Android Wear smartwatches. The software records data from built-in accelerometers and gyroscopes, records ambient noise using built-in microphones, and logs received Bluetooth low energy (BLE) packets. Traces was designed with the aim to analyse wearers' localized physical activity and social interactions, where localization is supported by Eddystone BLE beacons.

2015

Newspaper/ Magazine Article

  • ACM Interactions          
    Writing About Accessibility

    Words or phrases can suggest bias or reflect negative, disparaging, or patronizing attitudes toward individuals or groups of individuals. These words and phrases can influence our impressions, attitudes, and even our actions. Choosing language that represents the preference of the groups to which it refers can convey respect and integrity. For these reasons, journalists, along with authorities in various research disciplines, have worked to provide guidelines for how to appropriately discuss disability issues.

Other outputs

Conference Proceeding

  • Working Notes of the 2nd Argumentation Mining Workshop, ACL'2015 , Denver          
    Combining Argument Mining Techniques

    In this paper, we look at three different methods of extracting the argumentative structure from a piece of natural language text. These methods cover linguistic features, changes in the topic being discussed and a supervised machine learning approach to identify the components of argumentation schemes, patterns of human reasoning which have been detailed extensively in philosophy and psychology. For each of these approaches we achieve results comparable to those previously reported, whilst at the same time achieving a more detailed argument structure.

  • Conference of Contemporary Ergonomics and Human Factors 2015          
    The role of co-design in wearables adoption

    Ageing and increases in longevity have become increasingly impactful in terms of emerging requirements for our built environments and designers face the challenge of creating enabling homes and spaces that support our changing needs. BESiDE Project at University of Dundee seeks to promote greater mobility, social connectedness and therefore wellbeing through better design. Care home residents are invited to use wearable technology to explore how well older adults living in care homes currently utilise their spaces.

  • 11th International European Academy of Design Conference, April 22-24th 2015          
    Co-designing appealing wearables with care home residents

    Increasingly, wearable technology is being used to garner information about our health, lifestyle and general wellbeing, potentially offering valuable insight and analysis of our physical capabilities, needs and health requirements. Though designed to fit on our bodies and around our personal routines, these wearable devices are more often created to suit the lifestyle and needs of younger, more active and tech savvy users.

  • Proceedings of the 1st European Conference on Argumentation (ECA 2015)          
    Working with Open Argument Corpora

    AIFdb Corpora provides a facility to group Argument Interchange Format (AIF) argument maps and search for maps that are related to each other (for example, analyses of related texts.) Users can create and share corpora containing any number of argument maps from within AIFdb. By integrating with the OVA+ analysis tool, AIFdb Corpora allows for the creation of corpora compliant with both AIF and Inference Anchoring Theory, a philosophically and linguistically grounded counterpart to AIF.

2014

Academic Conference Presentation

  • Digital Futures 2014, Annual Digital Economy All Hands Conference          
    Creativity and Connectivity: Co-design with Care Homes

    Current trends within the landscape of social and residential care are enabling an emphasis on person centred care; an approach which aims to ‘see’ and care for patients as individuals rather than focusing on any illness or on abilities they may have lost. Using activity-monitoring devices such as accelerometers can further facilitate a care provider’s knowledge and understanding of an individual’s needs and physical capabilities. Unfortunately, despite the insight that can be garnered from such devices, they are rarely designed with older adults in mind.

  • Digital Futures 2014, Annual Digital Economy All Hands Conference          
    Introducing BESiDE: The Built Environment for Social Inclusion in the Digital Economy

    In this paper, we describe how BESiDE investigates themes of ageing, wellbeing, and digital technologies within the context of built environment design. Focused on initial reflections from contemporary design practice we discuss that, design guidance; a lack of research ‘tools’ to engage with users; an absent research culture; and missing elements of design training, are factors preventing a designer’s contextual engagement with the experiences of older people and technologies within the built environment.

Newspaper/ Magazine Article

  • Access Today, Journal of the Access Association          
    Care Homes: How can the building better support older adults in maintaining their wellbeing, independence, mobility and quality of life? published in Access Today, Journal of the Access Association.

    We are the BESiDE (Built Environment for Social Inclusion in the Digital Economy) research team and we are carrying out work to tackle this challenge of finding out what is needed. We are giving a voice to the users, measuring physical activity, and tracing and modelling movement within care homes to generate evidence of what is needed in the future of care home design. Collaboration across disciplines of Computing, Architecture, Healthcare and Design is driving this research forward. In this article, Lesley discusses some initial findings from interviews with relevant stakeholders.

  • RIAS Quarterly (The Journal of the Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland).          
    Ageing and the Built Environment: BESiDE Research

    This article describes ‘BESiDE’ to an Architectural Community. It outlines how, based between the University of Dundee and Newcastle University, we are investigating themes of ageing, wellbeing, accessibility and digital technologies within built environment design.

  • Access by Design Journal, Centre for Accessible Environments (CAE)          
    Early Accessibility Pioneer and the Grandfather of Universal Design, Selwyn Goldsmith (1932-2011)

    Our Researcher CoI Dr Lesley McIntyre was awarded a RIBA Research Trust Award to collate and write the monograph of Selwyn Goldsmith and this article presents a summary of this research. (Philip) Selwyn Goldsmith, Architect, Researcher and Author, worked relentlessly throughout his life to provide understanding for access and inclusion within architectural design.

  • ACM SIGACCESS: Special Interest Group on Accessible Computing Newsletter          
    BESIDE:The Built Environment for Social Inclusion through the Digital Economy

    This article describes BESiDE, a multi-disciplinary research project that investigates themes of ageing, wellbeing, accessibility and digital technologies within the context of built environment design. Through the development of dialogue tools, indoor localization and physical activity tracking sensors, BESiDE is taking steps towards enhancing understanding of accessibility within the design of care home environments.

  • Scottish Care Bulletin          
    Can Care Home Buildings Support Health and Wellbeing? How the built environment can support residents' wellbeing through better visiting times.

    This briefing paper reports on early findings from interviews with visitors to care homes. It highlights key themes from 13 interviews in which visitors report on how important building and design can be in creating an environment which supports a homely atmosphere for their residents. The paper points to the importance of visitors and how welcome they find a choice of visiting spaces, which allow for privacy when necessary, as well as their overall desire to have a home that supports relaxed behaviour, common in a domestic setting.

  • Access by Design, Centre for Accessible Environments          
    Gathering Evidence for enabling care home design

    This article describes ‘BESiDE’ to the National community of Built Environment Professionals interested in accessibility. It outlines how, based between the University of Dundee and Newcastle University, we are investigating themes of ageing, wellbeing, accessibility and digital technologies within built environment design.

Conference Proceeding

  • ASSETS The 16th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility          
    Buildings and Users with Visual Impairment: Uncovering Factors for Accessibility using BITKit.

    In this paper, we report on the experiences of visually impaired users in navigating buildings. We focus on an investigation of the way-finding experiences by 10 participants with varying levels of visual ability, as they undertook a way-finding task in unfamiliar public building. Through applying the BITKit framework in this preliminary user study, we were able to uncover 54 enabling and disabling interactions within the building.

  • COMMA Fifth International Conference on Computational Models of Argument          
    Generalising argument dialogue with the Dialogue Game Execution Platform

    In this paper, we present the Dialogue Game Execution Platform (DGEP), developed as part of the BESiDE Purposeful Talk package. DGEP is able to process and execute any dialogue game specified in a general description language and build arguments and dialogue histories that can be used by a wide variety of existing dialogue tools. DGEP allows us to generalise techniques for generation and investigation of dialogues and, through a set of web services, connect a wide variety of multi-agent systems and human-computer interfaces for dialogue.

  • COMMA Fifth International Conference on Computational Models of Argument          
    Lakatos Games for Mathematical Argument

    Presents a dialogue game representation of Lakatos's theory of justification and discovery in mathematics and describes our implementation of the game using in the "Dialogue Game Description Language" developed as part of the BESiDE Purposeful Talk package. This builds upon the work carried out in the BESiDE project to create a robust platform for handling dialogues, and provides the basis for systems which can be used both to aid scientists and mathematicians in their work and to train students to think and interact in expert-like ways.

Other outputs

  • Facilites Management Journal Website FMJ.co.uk           Best Paper
    A Case Study of adopting BIT-Kit: A Method Uncovering the Impact Buildings have on People.

    In current architectural discourse there is a lack of method in building evidence to understand the link between buildings and the wellbeing, independence and mobility of the people who use them. In response to this knowledge gap, the Building Interactions Toolkit (BIT-Kit) supports the gathering of real-world interaction evidence within buildings.

2013

Published Abstracts

  • RIBA 2013 Education Yearbook          
    RIBA Trust: Selwyn Goldsmith (1932-2011) and the Architectural Model of Disability: A Retrospective of the Man and the Model

    Affectionately known as the ‘Early Accessibility Pioneer’ and the ‘Grandfather of Universal Design’, Goldsmith, the first Architect to receive the Harding Award for his services to disabled people, led the way in providing understanding of disability within the context of Architecture. In this talk I discussed his life, architectural adventures and the implications of his most significant contribution to architecture, the Architectural Model of Disability.

Conference Proceeding

  • CHI ’13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems          
    BESiDE: The Built Environment for Social Inclusion in the Digital Economy

    We describe BESiDE, a multi-disciplinary research project that investigates themes of ageing, wellbeing, and digital technologies within the context of built environment design. Focused on initial reflections from contemporary design practice we discuss that, design guidance; a lack of research 'tools' to engage with users; an absent research culture; and missing elements of design training, are factors preventing a designer's holistic engagement with the experiences of older people and technologies within the built environment.